Static Code Analyzers

Static Code Analyzers and formatting tools

Qt Creator plugins

Just reIf you just started to familiar yourself with Qt’s IDE, this is my advice. After a long time of daily usage became my favorite developing IDE, as it is covering almost every part of the work I do on a daily basis. However there are three (3rd party) plugins am always adding to my Qt Creator IDE wherever I work on-site or in the office they are very useful. Especially CppCheck but gtest and the DB viewing tool can coming handy.
Qt Creator CppCheck integration plugin
Qt Creator Google C++ Testing Framework integration plugin
Qt Creator SQL database viewer plugin

All three plugins developed by Gres

Bottom line: a good and comfortable development enviromet setup if playing a key role of utilizing your almost always limited time and result an efficient way of your daily developing work.
Valgrind (adding memory and function profiler feature to Qt Creator), sometimes preferring GDB instead of LLDB especially project on OSX.
I also use Doxygen for generating documentation from annotated C++ sources.
You can enable/disable plugins, I strongly recommend to enable this very convenient plugging, it is much more helpful compare to my previously used tool. It recognizes notes: TODO, BUG, FIXME, NOTE, HACK by default.

Very simply to use. Here is one of my projects TODO list just started.

Click image to zoom inClick image to zoom in

Sort My List

Sort My List an easy to use very handy online tool where You can sort or clean your list in a variety of ways. This simple online tool could help you remove, add, separate data without using other other softwares sorting features. There are limitations in this online tool, and I won’t recommend on large datasets, however in many cases could be very handy, removing unwanted whitespaces or any characters.
Find out more: sortmylist.com

Bjarne Stroustrup announces C++ Core Guidelines

This morning in his opening keynote at CppCon, Bjarne Stroustrup announced the C++ Core Guidelines (github.com/isocpp/CppCoreGuidelines), the start of a new open source project on GitHub to build modern authoritative guidelines for writing C++ code.

The guidelines are designed to be modern, machine-enforceable wherever possible, and open to contributions and forking so that organizations can easily incorporate them into their own corporate coding guidelines.

Read more on the source site: [https://isocpp.org]

In addition you might find very useful to read Bjarne Stroustrup’s C++ Style and Technique FAQ [Updated Modified February 13, 2016]